Tuesday, September 13, 2011

NATURALLY FREE

So I guess you're probably wondering what I'm talking about. I'm going to discuss my transition from wearing chemically processed hair to natural hair. For as long as I can remember, I have always wanted long straight hair. The desire was influenced by images I saw on television and by females that I encountered day to day. As a young girl, my mother did not allow me to put relaxers in my hair. The only method of straightening my hair was through a straightening comb or a flat iron. Even still, all the heat from those products caused damage to my hair. When I turned 18, in an effort to be like everyone else around me, I had my first relaxer put in my hair. I was so happy and I felt better about myself. For the next five years I continued to put relaxers and hair color in my hair. I also wore extensions from time to time which actually did more damage than good to my hair.  In June 2008, after one too many relaxers and hair colorings I decided that I would go natural. My definition of natural included removing all the processed hair from my head and wearing my hair in styles that required less extensive heat. I never thought that I would have come to a point in my life where I would actually cut off most of my hair and wear it in its natural state. I honestly thought that it would take a while for me to get use to my new look, but I actually loved the look which allowed me to embrace the change. Now that I am free I exercise without worrying too much about my hair, I can go out in the rain without worrying about my hair frizzing up, and I no longer have to spend hours on straightening my hair. Those are just some of the benefits that I have reaped since I became natural. Being natural is not for everyone. You have to really be comfortable within yourself and you have to know how to deal with negativity. Since I have been wearing my hair natural, I have dealt with positivity and negativity. When comparing a picture of myself with relaxed hair to my current state, this one lady said, "You were so pretty." I then realized that many people shared the same view that I once shared about beauty. Nevertheless, we know that people describe beauty in different ways. That will be another blog. I guess the worst part about being natural is that everyone will not accept you even when you have accepted who you are. Sometimes this can affect you especially in the workplace. Society has certain expectations when it comes to your physical appearance. The profession that you choose to go after also plays a role in what is acceptable and what is not acceptable. Unfortunately, there is no definite way of knowing  if you are being overlooked because of your appearance unless someone tells you that directly. As a young child and young adult I always wanted to look like someone that I wasn't. I have now come to accept who I am, natural hair and all.

2 comments:

  1. very nice....I'm still trying to get to my natural hair after all these years lol even thou you say straightened isn't natural but I haven't straightened it in almost 4 mos. I'm going the rest of the year like this I think lol

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  2. Very interesting only because as a man I never thought that some men struggled with their natural hair too until a few men told me that they dyed their grey hair, or when i inquired about one mans dark color hair, he replied that what I wanted to know was information between him and his barber,LOL. Anyway I am 100% completely satisfied with my African heritage, by the way the ignorance that we allow our American heritage to take away from our African heritage is sad.

    Dad

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